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Additional notes for state- and county population data:

ALABAMA NOTES
Most of present-day Alabama was part of Georgia until the south-central part was included in Mississippi Territory, whose establishment was authorized by Congress in 1798 and agreed to by Georgia in 1802. In 1804, Mississippi Territory was expanded to include the rest of Alabama except for the Gulf Coast portion, which was added in 1812 although still in dispute with Spain until 1819. Alabama became a territory in 1817, and was admitted as a State on December 14, 1819 with substantially its present boundaries.
Census coverage of Alabama began in 1800, included much of the State by 1820, and added the rest by 1840. The totals for 1800 and 1810 are for areas then in Mississippi Territory. In 1820 the official State total (127,901) did not include the population (16,416) of three counties whose census returns only arrived in Washington in 1822.
County Notes:
Note 1: Populations for 1800 and 1810 are totals of those counties of Mississippi Territory entirely or mostly within present-day Alabama. Population for 1820 excludes three counties, Lawrence (8,652), Perry (4,118), and Washington (3,646), whose returns were received too late for inclusion in the official State total.
Note 2: Bullock: *Pike, Macon, Montgomery, Barbour.
Note 3: Chilton: *Bibb, Shelby, Autauga, Perry; 1870: Baker.
Note 4: Cleburne: *Calhoun, Randolph, Talladega.
Note 5: Crenshaw: *Butler, Covington, Pike, Lowndes; Coffee.
Note 6: Elmore: *Coosa, Autauga, Montgomery, Tallapoosa.
Note 7: Etowah: *Cherokee, DeKalb, St. Clair, Marshall, Calhoun, Blount.
Note 8: Hale: *Greene, Marengo, Perry, Tuscaloosa.
Note 9: Lamar: *Fayette, Marion; 1870: Sanford.
Note 10: Lee: *Russell, Chambers, Macon, Tallapoosa.
Note 11: Lowndes: *Montgomery, Dallas, Henry; Butler, Wilcox.
Note 12: Marshall: *Blount, Jackson; St. Clair, Madison.
Note 13: Mobile: Population for 1890 includes 384 Indians (Geronimo's Apaches) at Mount Vernon Barracks, reported separately.
Note 14: Morgan: Morgan's 1820-30 census boundaries were the same as those of 1850-1870 and nearly the same as those of 1880-1990.
Note 15: Pike: *Henry, Montgomery; Butler.
Note 16: Walker: *Marion, Tuscaloosa, Blount, Jefferson.

ALASKA NOTES
Alaska was purchased from Russia in 1867, with essentially its present boundaries. It was made a territory in 1912 and admitted as a State on January 3, 1959.
Census coverage of Alaska began in 1880. For the censuses of 1930 and 1940, Alaska actually was enumerated in the fall of the preceding year (1929, 1939).
County Notes:
Note 1: Alaska has no counties; the names, boundaries, and designations of the subdivisions reported in the census have evolved considerably over recent decades. In 1990 and 1980, most of the population of the State lived in entities designated as Boroughs; the remainder was reported by Census Areas (sometimes abbreviated C.A.). In 1970, the census was reported by Census Divisions, some of which corresponded to boroughs. In 1960, the census was reported by 24 Election Districts. The table in Part III lists areas that existed in 1990 with their 1990 names and designations. In both the table and the notes, areas listed without any designation had ceased to exist by 1990, when all areas were either Boroughs or Census Areas.
Note 2: For areas that existed in 1960, 1970, or 1980 but not in 1990, the notes specify the areas of which they became part. (Small portions may have come from or gone to other areas not specified.) No designations appear in the table for these extinguished areas; in 1980 they were Census Areas, in 1970 Census Divisions, and in 1960 Election Districts.
Note 3: Aleutians East Borough: formed from Aleutian Islands (now Aleutians West) Census Area (1987). 1980 pop. in 1990 area: 1,643.
Note 4: Aleutians West Census Area: in 1960-80, Aleutian Islands. 1980 pop. in 1990 area: 6,125.
Note 5: Dillingham Census Area: in 1960-70, Bristol Bay (Census Division). 1970 pop. in 1980 area: 3,872; 1980 pop. in 1990 area: 3,232.
Note 6: Lake and Peninsula Borough: formed from Dillingham Census Area (1989). 1980 pop. in 1990 area: 1,384.
Note 7: North Slope Borough: formed 1972, from Barrow, Upper Yukon, and Kobuk (Northwest Arctic). Populations shown for 1960-70 are for Barrow. 1970 pop. in 1980 area: 3,451.
Note 8A: Northwest Arctic Borough: formed 1986, primarily from Kobuk Census Area. Populations shown for 1960-80 are for Kobuk. 1970 pop. in 1980 area: 4,048; 1980 pop. in 1990 area: 4,831.
Note 8B: Valdez-Cordova Census Area: in 1960-70, Valdez-Chitina-Whittier. 1970 pop. in 1980 area: 4,977.
Note 9: For 1910 through 1950, Alaska Territory was reported by four Judicial Divisions. These corresponded to the areas listed in the table approximately as follows (names are shortened in some cases):
First Judicial Division: Angoon, Haines, Juneau, Ketchikan, Lynn Canal, Outer Ketchikan, Prince of Wales, Sitka, Skagway, and Wrangell.
Second Judicial Division: Barrow, Nome, North Slope, Northwest Arctic, and Wade Hampton.
Third Judicial Division: Aleutians (East and West), Anchorage, Bristol Bay, Dillingham, Cordova, Kenai, Kodiak, Lake and Peninsula,
Matanuska, Seward, and Valdez.
Fourth Judicial Division: Bethel, Fairbanks, Kuskokwim, Southeast Fairbanks, Upper Yukon, and Yukon-Koyukuk.
Note 10: In 1880, 1890, and 1900, Alaska was reported by two Districts. The Northern District corresponded roughly to Judicial Divisions 2 and 4 of 1910, and the Southern District corresponded roughly to Judicial Divisions 1 and 3 of 1910 (see note 9).

ARIZONA NOTES
Arizona was acquired from Mexico in 1848 and 1853. It was established as a territory in 1863 from New Mexico Territory, and acquired essentially its present boundaries in 1866. Arizona was admitted as a State on February 4, 1912.
In 1850 present-day Arizona had no census coverage. The 1860 population is for Arizona County, New Mexico Territory, which comprised most of present-day Arizona south of the Gila River. Northern and central Arizona first had census coverage in 1870.
County Notes:
Note 1: Population for 1860 is for Arizona County, New Mexico Territory.
Note 2: Totals for 1890 and 1900 include population of certain Indian reservations not reported by county (1890: 28,623; 1900: 3,065).
Note 3: La Paz County (1980 pop. 12,557) was formed from Yuma County in 1983.

ARKANSAS NOTES
Arkansas was acquired as part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and was included in Louisiana Territory, established in 1805 and comprising the whole of the Louisiana Purchase north of present-day Louisiana. Arkansas (then spelled Arkansaw) became a territory in 1819 and at first included most of present-day Oklahoma; in 1828 it reached essentially its present boundaries, although the boundary with Texas was incorrectly interpreted at that time. Arkansas was admitted as a State on June 15, 1836.
In 1810, census coverage of Louisiana Territory was limited to portions of present-day Arkansas and Missouri, mainly close to the Mississippi River. The 1810 census was reported by districts; the total for 1810 is for Arkansas District, which was entirely within present-day Arkansas. New Madrid District, which included the northern part of present-day Arkansas, was mainly in Missouri. In 1820 census coverage included much of the present State and a small number of people in present-day Oklahoma and Texas. By 1830 census coverage included the whole of Arkansas, and also included (in old Miller County) a portion of today's Texas.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1810 is population of Arkansas District, Louisiana Territory. Total for 1890 includes 32 Indians in prison, not reported by county.
Note 2: Cleveland: *Bradley, Jefferson, Dallas; 1880: Dorsey.
Note 3: Columbia: *Lafayette, Union, Ouachita, Hempstead.
Note 4: Howard: *Sevier, Polk, Hempstead, Pike; Little River.
Note 5: Lee: *Phillips, St. Francis, Monroe, Crittenden.
Note 6: The first Miller County, established in 1820 by Arkansas Territory, included some population within the legal boundaries of Spanish Mexico and some within present-day Oklahoma; in 1830 the area reported as Miller was actually entirely within Mexico (Texas). By 1840, with the location of boundaries better understood, it no longer existed as an Arkansas county. The present Miller County was created in 1874.
Note 7: Stone: *Izard, Independence, Van Buren, Searcy.

CALIFORNIA NOTES
California was part of the region acquired from Mexico in 1848, and was admitted as a State on September 9, 1850 with essentially its present boundaries.
Although the 1850 census covered the whole State, the 1850 returns are incomplete; those for Contra Costa and Santa Clara Counties were lost before reaching Washington, and those for San Francisco County were destroyed by fire.
County Notes:
Note 1: The 1850 total is incomplete; the returns for Contra Costa and Santa Clara Counties were lost before reaching Washington; those for San Francisco County were destroyed by fire. The State census of 1852 showed a population of 2,786 for Contra Costa, 36,154 for San Francisco, and 6,764 for Santa Clara; the 1852 State total was 215,122, excluding El Dorado County, whose population was not enumerated but was estimated at 40,000.
Note 2: Total for 1890 includes population (5,268) of certain Indian reservations not reported by county.

COLORADO NOTES
Although part of Colorado was acquired as early as the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, it had no organized government until 1850, when parts of the present State were included in New Mexico and Utah Territories. Colorado was established as a territory in 1861 with its present boundaries, from parts of Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Utah Territories. The 1860 population is the total enumerated within the 1861 boundaries. Colorado was admitted as a State on August 1, 1876. Present-day Colorado had no census coverage in 1850, and none in 1860 for the portion taken from Utah Territory.
County Notes:
Note 1: Population shown for 1860 is that enumerated in the area organized in 1861 as Colorado Territory from parts of Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Utah Territories. This total was not reported by county.
Note 2: Total for 1890 includes population (1,051) of the Ute (Southern Ute) Indian Reservation, not reported by county.
Note 3: Larimer County's 1870-80 census boundaries were the same as those of 1910-90.

CONNECTICUT NOTES
Connecticut was one of the 13 original States. Apart from claims to territory in the West, relinquished by 1800, its boundaries have remained substantially unchanged; small cessions to Massachusetts were made shortly after 1800.
Census coverage included all of Connecticut from 1790 on.
There are no county notes for Connecticut.

DELAWARE NOTES
Delaware was one of the 13 original States, and has had essentially its current boundaries since Colonial times.
Census coverage included all of Delaware from 1790 on.
There are no county notes for Delaware.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA NOTES
The District of Columbia was formed in 1791 from territory ceded by Maryland and Virginia, but remained in some respects under their jurisdiction until the National government moved there in 1800. The District included the existing small cities of Georgetown and Alexandria as well as the site chosen for the Nation's new capital, Washington. In 1846 the portion south of the Potomac River, including Alexandria, was retroceded to Virginia.
In 1800 the census reported the District as part of Maryland and Virginia. All populations shown in the table exclude the portion returned to Virginia in 1846.
County Notes:
Note 1: Population for 1800-40 is for the present territory of the District; it excludes Alexandria County, then a part of the District but retroceded to Virginia in 1846 and now comprising Arlington County and much of the city of Alexandria. Population of the District as then constituted: 1800: 14,093; 1810: 24,023; 1820: 33,039; 1830: 39,834; 1840: 43,712.
Note 2: The portion of the District ceded by Maryland became Washington County in 1801. The governmental relationship between the county and Washington and Georgetown cities changed over time; in 1874 all local governments in the District were superseded by a single government established by Congress. However, from 1810 to 1890 the census regularly was reported in terms of the 3 subdivisions shown for those dates in the table. From 1900 through 1990, the census has reported the District and the city of Washington as coextensive.
Through 1920, however, the census also specified the populations within the old boundaries of the 3 former subdivisions, as follows:
name/yr 1920, 1910, 1900
Georgetown 17083, 16046, 14459
Washington 268208, 230630, 218196
Remainder 152280, 84393, 45973
Note 3: Data refer to remainder of present area of District of Columbia outside of Washington and Georgetown cities; reported as Washington County or with various other designations.

FLORIDA NOTES
Florida was a Spanish possession until transferred to the United States by treaty, concluded in 1819 but not in full effect until 1821. Florida was made a territory in 1822 with essentially its present boundaries, and was admitted as a State on March 3, 1845.
From 1830 on, all parts of Florida have had census coverage.
County Notes:
Note 1: Brevard: *Mosquito (Orange), Monroe. Originally named St. Lucie; renamed Brevard in 1855. The current St. Lucie County was created in 1905.
Note 2: DeSoto, Manatee, Sarasota: After 1950 some sparsely settled portions of Manatee and Sarasota were annexed to DeSoto, but these changes were reversed after 1960.
Note 3: Escambia, Walton: Escambia's 1830 population comprises 2,518 "west of Escambia River, including St. Rosa Island" and 868 "between Yellow and Escambia Rivers"; part of this area was in Walton County.
Note 4: Hernando: *Mosquito (Orange), Alachua, Hillsborough; 1850: Benton. Population for 1860 is estimated; the 1860 census did not enumerate the county.
Note 5: Jackson, Washington: Jackson's 1830 population excludes the portion west of Holmes Creek, which was reported with Washington, and includes the portion of Washington on the Chipola and Apalachicola Rivers.
Note 6: Walton, Washington: Walton's 1830 population is for the territory between the Choctowatchee and Yellow Rivers, including the isthmus south of the Choctowatchee; part of this area was in Washington County.

GEORGIA NOTES
Georgia was one of the 13 original States. At the close of the Revolution it included most of present-day Alabama and Mississippi, an area which finally became Mississippi Territory in 1802. In that year Georgia reached essentially its present boundaries, although survey uncertainties resulted in continuing disputes with bordering States over subsequent decades.
Census coverage in 1790 and 1800 was limited to the eastern portions of the present State near the Savannah River and the Atlantic coast; there was no coverage of present-day Alabama or Mississippi. The population for 1810 excludes 1,026 persons in (old) Walton County, reported as a Georgia county but later determined to be in North Carolina. Census coverage of the State was relatively complete by 1840.
County Notes:
Note 1: State total for 1810 excludes population (1,026) of (old) Walton County, reported as a Georgia county but later determined to be situated in western North Carolina.
Note 2: Atkinson: *Coffee, Clinch.
Note 3: Bacon: *Appling, Pierce, Ware.
Note 4: Baldwin: *Hancock; Washington.
Note 5: Banks: *Franklin, Habersham, Hall.
Note 6: Barrow: *Jackson, Gwinnett, Walton.
Note 7: Bartow: *Gwinnett, Carroll, DeKalb; 1840-60: Cass.
Note 8: Berrien: *Lowndes, Irwin.
Note 9: Brantley: *Wayne, Pierce, Charlton.
Note 10: Brooks: *Lowndes, Thomas.
Note 11: Bryan: *Effingham, Chatham.
Note 12: Bulloch: *Effingham; 1800-70: Bullock.
Note 13: Campbell was annexed to Fulton in 1932.
Note 14: Candler: *Emanuel, Bulloch, Tattnall.
Note 15: Catoosa: *Walker, Murray.
Note 16: Charlton: *Camden, Ware, Wayne.
Note 17: Chattahoochee: *Muscogee; Marion.
Note 18: Cherokee: *Gwinnett, Hall, DeKalb.
Note 19: Clarke: *Jackson, Greene.
Note 20: Clay: *Early, Randolph.
Note 21: Clayton: *Fayette, Henry.
Note 22: Clinch was created from Lowndes and Ware, but only the portion taken from Lowndes was reported as Clinch in 1850; the portion taken from Ware was reported with Ware.
Note 23: Cobb: *DeKalb, Carroll, Gwinnett.
Note 24: Coffee: *Telfair, Irwin, Coffee, Clinch.
Note 25: Colquitt: *Thomas, Lowndes.
Note 26: Dawson: *Lumpkin, Gilmer.
Note 27: Dodge: *Pulaski, Telfair, Montgomery; Laurens.
Note 28: Dougherty: *Baker; Irwin, Dooly.
Note 29: Douglas: *Campbell, Carroll; Cobb.
Note 30: Echols: *Lowndes, Clinch.
Note 31: Emanuel: *Montgomery, Bulloch.
Note 32: Floyd: *Carroll, Gwinnett.
Note 33: Forsyth: *Gwinnett, Hall.
Note 34: Fulton: *DeKalb, Cobb; annexed Campbell and Milton in 1932.
Note 35: Gilmer: *Hall, Gwinnett.
Note 36: Grady: *Decatur, Thomas.
Note 37: Hall: *Jackson, Franklin.
Note 38: Hancock: *Washington, Greene.
Note 39: Haralson: *Carroll, Paulding.
Note 40: Hart: *Franklin, Elbert.
Note 41: Heard: *Carroll, Troup, Coweta.
Note 42: Jasper was named Randolph until after 1810. Present-day Randolph County was created in 1828.
Note 43: Jeff Davis: *Appling, Coffee.
Note 44: Jefferson: *Burke, Richmond, Washington.
Note 45: Jenkins: *Burke, Emanuel, Scriven (Screven); Bulloch.
Note 46: Johnson: *Emanuel, Laurens, Washington.
Note 47: Lanier: *Berrien, Clinch, Lowndes.
Note 48: Laurens County's 1880-1900 census boundaries were the same as those of 1920-90.
Note 49: Lumpkin: *Hall, Habersham.
Note 50: McDuffie: *Columbia, Warren.
Note 51: Macon: *Marion, Houston.
Note 52: Madison: *Elbert, Franklin, Jackson, Oglethorpe, Clarke.
Note 53: Milton: *Cobb, Cherokee, Forsyth, DeKalb; annexed to Fulton in 1932.
Note 54: Murray: *Gwinnett, Hall.
Note 55: Newton: *Walton; Jasper, Morgan.
Note 56: Oglethorpe: *Wilkes, Greene.
Note 57: Peach: *Houston; Macon.
Note 58: Pickens: *Cherokee, Gilmer.
Note 59: Pierce: *Ware, Appling.
Note 60: Polk: *Paulding, Floyd.
Note 61: Quitman: *Randolph, Stewart.
Note 62: Rockdale: *Newton, Henry.
Note 63: Schley: *Marion, Sumter, Macon.
Note 64: Screven: *Burke, Effingham; 1800-70: Scriven.
Note 65: Spalding: *Pike, Henry, Fayette.
Note 66: Stephens: *Franklin, Habersham.
Note 67: Taliaferro: *Wilkes, Hancock, Greene, Warren, Oglethorpe.
Note 68: Taylor: *Talbot, Marion, Macon, Crawford.
Note 69: Terrell: *Lee, Randolph.
Note 70: Tift: *Berrien, Irwin, Worth.
Note 71: Toombs: *Tattnall, Montgomery, Emanuel.
Note 72: Treutlen: *Montgomery, Emanuel.
Note 73: Turner: *Irwin, Worth, Wilcox, Dooly.
Note 74: Union: *Habersham, Hall.
Note 75: Walker: *Gwinnett, Hall.
Note 76: Walton: The first Walton County was created in 1803 as a Georgia county and was reported in 1810 as part of Georgia; it was abolished in 1812 after a review of the State boundary determined its area to be located in North Carolina. The present-day Walton County was created in 1818, comprising territory included in Jackson County in 1810.
Note 77: Ware: *Appling; see also note 22.
Note 78: Warren: *Richmond, Wilkes; Burke.
Note 79: Wheeler: *Montgomery, Laurens.
Note 80: Whitfield: *Murray, Walker.
Note 81: Wilcox: *Irwin, Dooly, Pulaski.
Note 82: Worth: *Irwin, Dooly; Thomas.

HAWAII NOTES
Hawaii was an independent nation prior to ceding its sovereignty to the United States in 1898; it was made a territory in 1900. On August 21, 1959, Hawaii was admitted as a State and assumed its present boundaries, omitting certain small islands formerly included in the territory.
Census coverage has included the whole of Hawaii since 1900. The Hawaiian government conducted at least 9 censuses between 1850 and 1898; see Robert C Schmitt, Historical Statistics of Hawaii (Honolulu: University Press of Hawaii, 1977).
County Notes:
Note 1: Populations are shown for counties and for inhabited islands. The 1900 census was reported by islands; counties were first organized in 1905. The inhabited islands relate to counties as follows: Hawaii County comprises Hawaii; Honolulu County comprises Oahu and certain small islands (see note 2); Kauai County comprises Kauai and Niihau; and Maui County comprises Kahoolawe, Lanai, Maui, and Molokai, except that Kalawao County occupies a small portion of Molokai. Total for 1940 excludes population (560) of Midway and other small islands reported with Hawaii although not part of the Territory; totals for 1910 through 1930 exclude population of Midway (35 in 1910, 31 in 1920, 36 in 1930).
Note 2: Honolulu: Honolulu County, officially the City and County of Honolulu, comprises Oahu and the small islands northwest of Kauai and Niihau extending from Nihoa to Kure except for Midway. Prior to 1959 Palmyra, located about 1000 miles south of the Hawaiian chain, also was included. Population enumerated on the small northwestern islands is included in the Honolulu County and Oahu island totals (15 in 1960, 31 in 1970, 31 in 1980, zero in 1990; separate data not available for other censuses).
Note 3: Kalawao County was reported as part of Maui County in 1930-1950 and in 1970; the data have been adjusted to show it separately at all dates.

IDAHO NOTES
Idaho was part of Oregon Territory, definitively acquired in 1846, and was included in Washington Territory upon its establishment in 1853. Idaho became a separate territory in 1863, acquired essentially its present boundaries in 1868, and was admitted as a State on July 3, 1890.
Census coverage of present-day Idaho virtually began in 1870, when nearly its whole area was included.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1930 includes population (1 person) of the portion of Yellowstone National Park in Idaho, which had no population in 1940-60 and was included in Fremont County in 1970-90. In 1890-1920, any population in the Idaho portion of the park was reported with the Wyoming portion.
Note 2: Total for 1890 includes population (4,163) of certain Indian reservations not reported by county.

ILLINOIS NOTES
Illinois was included in the Northwest Territory established in 1787 and then in Indiana Territory (1800). Illinois Territory was established in 1809, and included virtually all of present-day Wisconsin and portions of Minnesota and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Illinois was admitted as a State on December 3, 1818 with essentially its present boundaries.
In 1790 the Northwest Territory had no census coverage. The population shown for 1800 is the total of two counties and one community in present-day Illinois, at that time part of Indiana Territory. Knox County, Indiana Territory, also included some population in what is now Illinois. In 1810, the returns for the two counties of Illinois Territory included some settlements in present-day Wisconsin. The northern part of the State was not fully covered by the census until 1830.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1800 comprises the populations reported for Randolph and St. Clair Counties, Indiana Territory, plus the population (100) of Opee (Peoria), included with St. Clair County. Total for 1890 includes 1 Indian in prison, not reported by county.
Note 2: Christian: *Sangamon, Montgomery, Shelby.
Note 3: Clay: *Crawford, Wayne; Edwards.
Note 4: Kankakee: *Iroquois, Will, Vermilion.
Note 5: La Salle: *Putnam, Tazewell, Vermilion.
Note 6: In 1830 McDonough County was reported with Schuyler, and Peoria County was reported with Putnam.
Note 7: Putnam: *Clark, Madison, Bond; see also note 6.
Note 8: The Rock Island-Whiteside county boundary differed slightly in 1860 from its alignment in 1840-50 and 1870-1990.

INDIANA NOTES
Indiana was included in the Northwest Territory (1787) but became a separate territory in 1800. At that time, in addition to most of present-day Indiana, the Territory included all of Illinois and Wisconsin, the western half of Michigan, and northeastern Minnesota. In 1802 the boundary with Ohio was altered and eastern Michigan was added, but Michigan Territory was separated in 1805 and Illinois Territory in 1809, leaving Indiana Territory with the present State area except for a narrow band along the northern border; the territory also included a portion of the Michigan Upper Peninsula. On December 11, 1816 Indiana was admitted as a State with essentially its present boundaries.
In 1790 the Northwest Territory had no census coverage. The 1800 census of Indiana Territory enumerated scattered communities in southern Indiana, southwestern Illinois, northern Michigan, and Wisconsin; the populations reported from present-day Illinois and Michigan are shown under those States. In addition, Hamilton County, Ohio included some population in what is now Indiana. In 1810, census coverage of Indiana Territory was limited to southern Indiana, and coverage did not include the whole State until 1830.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1800 comprises Knox County, Indiana Territory, part of which was in present-day Illinois, and the population of two settlements in present-day Wisconsin, Green Bay (50) and Prairie du Chien (65). The rest of Indiana Territory's 1800 enumerated population (5,641) is shown under Illinois (2,458) and Michigan (551).
Note 2: Brown: *Monroe, Bartholomew, Jackson.
Note 3: The Gibson-Warrick county boundary differed slightly in 1850 from its alignment in 1830-40 and 1860-1990.
Note 4: Grant: *Delaware, Cass; Madison.
Note 5: Union: *Franklin, Wayne, Fayette.
Note 6: Wabash County (unorganized) was reported in 1820. Its 1820 area was included in 1830 in Carroll, Warren, Tippecanoe, Clinton, Fountain, Montgomery, Hendricks, Morgan, Monroe, Owen, Parke, Vermillion, and (in small part) Clay. The present-day Wabash County was formed in 1832.
Note 7: Wells: *Allen, Delaware, Randolph.

IOWA NOTES
Iowa was acquired as part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and formed part of Louisiana Territory, renamed Missouri Territory in 1812. Iowa became a territory in 1838 and included present-day Minnesota and the Dakotas from the Mississippi River west to the Missouri River. Iowa was admitted as a State on December 28, 1846 with substantially its present boundaries.
Census coverage began in 1840, when it was limited to eastern Iowa, except for two settlements in present-day Minnesota that were included in Clayton County. The northwestern part of the State was not fully covered in the census until 1860.
County Notes:
Note 1: The 1840 total and Clayton County populations include two settlements in present-day Minnesota.
Note 2: Tama: Total for 1890 includes population (401) of Sac and Fox Indian Reservation, reported separately.

KANSAS NOTES
Most of present-day Kansas was included in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, forming part of Louisiana and then Missouri Territory. Kansas Territory was organized in 1854, and included part of present-day Colorado. Kansas was admitted as a State on January 29, 1861 with essentially its present boundaries.
Census coverage of Kansas began in 1860 and included the whole State by 1880. The 1860 census reported Kansas and Colorado Territory in terms of their 1861 boundaries.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1860 excludes the portion of Kansas Territory that became part of Colorado Territory in 1861. Total for 1890 includes 66 non-Indians on Indian reservations in Brown and Jackson Counties and 7 Indians in prison, not reported by county.
Note 2: Brown: Total for 1890 includes Indian population (477) of Kickapoo, Iowa, and Chippewa and Munsee Indian Reservations, reported separately.
Note 3: Haskell: Reported in 1880 as Arapahoe; an earlier Arapahoe County existed in 1860 in the portion of Kansas Territory that became Colorado Territory in 1861; its territory was reported in 1860 as part of Colorado.
Note 4: Jackson: Total for 1890 includes Indian population (462) of Pottawatomie Indian Reservation, reported separately.

KENTUCKY NOTES
Kentucky was part of Virginia prior to its admission as a State on June 1, 1792. It had essentially its present boundaries, except that because of erroneous surveys portions of the Kentucky-Tennessee boundary were in dispute for many years until finally resurveyed in 1859.
Kentucky was reported separately from Virginia in 1790; the county boundaries at that time corresponded to the present-day State lines between Kentucky and Virginia-West Virginia. Census coverage in 1790 included much of the State's territory, but the area west of the Tennessee River (the Jackson Purchase) was first enumerated in 1820.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1790 is for the counties of Virginia that comprised the present State of Kentucky.
Note 2: Adair: *Green; Cumberland.
Note 3: Allen: *Warren, Barren.
Note 4: Anderson: *Franklin, Washington.
Note 5: Ballard: *McCracken, Hickman.
Note 6: Bath: *Montgomery, Floyd.
Note 7: Bell: *Harlan, Knott; 1870: Josh Bell.
Note 8: Boyd: *Greenup, Carter, Lawrence.
Note 9: Boyle: *Mercer, Livingston.
Note 10: Breathitt: *Perry, Clay, Estill, Morgan.
Note 11: Bullitt: *Nelson, Jefferson.
Note 12: Caldwell: *Livingston, Christian.
Note 13: Calloway: *Caldwell, Livingston.
Note 14: Campbell: *Mason, Woodford.
Note 15: Carter: *Greenup, Lawrence, Morgan.
Note 16: Clark: *Bourbon, Fayette.
Note 17: Clay: *Madison, Floyd; Knox.
Note 18: Clinton: *Cumberland, Wayne.
Note 19: Daviess: *Ohio; Henderson.
Note 20: Edmonson: *Warren, Grayson, Hardin.
Note 21: Elliott: *Carter, Morgan, Lawrence.
Note 22: Estill: *Madison, Clark.
Note 23: Floyd: *Mason, Bourbon.
Note 24: Franklin: *Woodford, Jefferson, Mercer.
Note 25: Gallatin: *Woodford, Jefferson.
Note 26: Garrard: *Madison, Lincoln, Mercer.
Note 27: Graves: *Caldwell, Livingston.
Note 28: Green: *Lincoln, Nelson.
Note 29: Hancock: *Breckinridge, Ohio, Daviess.
Note 30: Harrison: *Bourbon, Woodford.
Note 31: Hart: *Hardin, Barren.
Note 32: Hickman: *Livingston, Caldwell.
Note 33: Jackson: *Laurel, Madison, Estill, Owsley, Rockcastle, Clay.
Note 34: Johnson: *Floyd, Lawrence.
Note 35: Knott: *Letcher, Floyd, Breathitt, Perry.
Note 36: Laurel: *Knox, Clay, Whitley.
Note 37: Lawrence: *Floyd, Greenup.
Note 38: Lee: *Owsley, Estill.
Note 39: McCreary: *Pulaski, Whitley, Wayne.
Note 40: McLean: *Daviess, Muhlenberg, Ohio.
Note 41: Magoffin: *Floyd, Morgan; Johnson.
Note 42: Martin: *Lawrence, Johnson, Pike.
Note 43: Meade: *Hardin, Breckinridge.
Note 44: Menifee: *Bath, Powell, Montgomery, Morgan.
Note 45: Metcalfe: *Barren, Adair; Monroe, Green; Cumberland.
Note 46: Monroe: *Barren, Cumberland.
Note 47: Morgan: *Floyd, Greenup, Bath.
Note 48: Nicholas: *Bourbon, Mason.
Note 49: Oldham: *Henry, Jefferson, Shelby.
Note 50: Owen: *Franklin, Scott, Gallatin; Harrison.
Note 51: Owsley: *Estill, Clay, Breathitt.
Note 52: Pendleton: *Woodford, Mason, Bourbon.
Note 53: Powell: *Montgomery, Clark, Estill.
Note 54: Robertson: *Nicholas, Bracken, Mason.
Note 55: Rockcastle: *Lincoln, Madison.
Note 56: Rowan: *Fleming, Morgan.
Note 57: Russell: *Adair, Cumberland, Wayne.
Note 58: Simpson: *Logan, Warren.
Note 59: Spencer: *Shelby, Nelson, Bullitt.
Note 60: Todd: *Christian, Warren.
Note 61: Trigg: *Christian, Caldwell.
Note 62: Trimble: *Oldham, Gallatin, Henry.
Note 63: Wayne: *Cumberland, Pulaski, Green.
Note 64: Webster: *Hopkins, Union, Henderson.
Note 65: Wolfe: *Morgan, Owsley, Powell.

LOUISIANA NOTES
Louisiana west of the Mississippi River was mostly part of the Louisiana Territory, which was ceded by Spain to France in 1803 and then sold by France to the United States. In 1804 much of the present State was included in the newly established Orleans Territory; the rest of the Louisiana Purchase became Louisiana Territory, renamed Missouri Territory in 1812. Louisiana was admitted as a State on April 30, 1812 and immediately added the Florida Parishes east of the Mississippi and north of Lake Pontchartrain, although these still were claimed by Spain until 1819. Also in 1819, the boundary with Mexico (Texas) was settled by treaty, bringing the State to essentially its present limits.
In 1810 the census covered most of the settled parts of what is now Louisiana, except for the Florida Parishes east of the Mississippi River. By 1820 census coverage extended to virtually all of the present State. Louisiana's primary subdivisions have long been termed parishes instead of counties; both terms appear in early censuses.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1810 is for Orleans Territory, and excludes the Florida Parishes east of the Mississippi River. Total for 1830 includes 210 persons returned in the aggregate rather than by county. Total for 1890 includes 1 Indian in prison, not reported by parish.
Note 2: Bienville: Population for 1860 is that published in the 1860 report as "estimated".
Note 3: Red River: *Natchitoches, Bienville, Caddo; Bossier.
Note 4: Richland: *Morehouse, Carroll, Franklin, Caldwell, Ouachita.
Note 5: Tangipahoa: *St. Tammany, Livingston, Washington, St. Helena.

MAINE NOTES
Although geographically separate, Maine was legally part of Massachusetts from early Colonial times until March 15, 1820, when it was admitted as a separate State. The far northern portion of Maine was in dispute with Canada until the present boundary was agreed to in 1842.
Census coverage included virtually all settled portions of Maine from 1790 on, with the Maine counties reported separately from those of Massachusetts proper.
County Notes:
Note 1: Populations for 1790-1810 are totals of the counties in the present area of Maine, then legally part of Massachusetts but reported separately.
Note 2: Androscoggin: *Cumberland, Kennebec, Lincoln, Oxford.
Note 3: Aroostook: *Penobscot, Washington.
Note 4: Otisfield town (1970 pop. 589) was transferred from Cumberland County to Oxford County in 1978.
Note 5: Franklin: *Oxford, Somerset, Kennebec.
Note 6: Kennebec: *Lincoln, Hancock.
Note 7: Oxford: *Cumberland, York; see also note 4.
Note 8: Penobscot: *Hancock, Somerset.
Note 9: Piscataquis: *Penobscot, Somerset.
Note 10: Waldo: *Hancock, Kennebec, Lincoln; Somerset.

MARYLAND NOTES
Maryland was one of the 13 original States. It helped form the District of Columbia in 1791; its boundaries have been substantially unchanged since then, although the Maryland-West Virginia boundary was in dispute as late as 1910.
Census coverage has included the entire State from 1790 on. The 1790 population includes the present area of the District of Columbia, separated from Maryland in 1791. The 1840 results for Montgomery County are from a re-enumeration of the population as of 1840, conducted in 1841.
County Notes:
Note 1: Parts of Prince George's and Montgomery Counties were taken to form the District of Columbia in 1791.
Note 2: Baltimore city has been reported separately from Baltimore County since 1860.
Note 3: Carroll: *Baltimore, Frederick.
Note 4: Wicomico: *Somerset, Worcester.

MASSACHUSETTS NOTES
Massachusetts was one of the 13 original States. Maine was legally part of Massachusetts from early Colonial times, although geographically separated; Maine became a separate State in 1820, leaving Massachusetts with nearly its present boundaries. A long-standing border dispute with Rhode Island was finally settled with a sizable exchange of territory in 1862.
Census coverage included all of Massachusetts from 1790 on. The counties comprising Maine were reported separately in 1790-1810.
County Notes:
Note 1: Totals for 1790-1810 do not include counties comprising Maine, reported separately (population 96,540 in 1790, 151,719 in 1800, 228,705 in 1810). Total for 1890 includes 4 Indians in prison, not reported by county.

MICHIGAN NOTES
Michigan was part of the Northwest Territory established in 1787. When Indiana Territory was created in 1800 it included the west half of lower Michigan and nearly all of the Upper Peninsula, leaving the remainder of the present State in the Northwest Territory until 1802, when the eastern portion also became part of Indiana Territory. Michigan Territory was established in 1805, but nearly all the Upper Peninsula remained in Indiana or Illinois Territories. In 1818 Michigan Territory's boundaries were extended to include the rest of the Upper Peninsula and all of present-day Wisconsin and northeastern Minnesota. In 1834 the Territory was expanded still further to stretch to the Missouri River, including the rest of Minnesota, Iowa, and the eastern Dakotas. Michigan Territory included a northern strip of Indiana until 1816, and it also governed a narrow strip of what is now northwestern Ohio which was claimed by that State. This was ceded to Ohio in 1836, and Michigan was admitted as a State on January 26, 1837 with essentially its present boundaries.
In 1790 the Northwest Territory had no census coverage. In 1800 coverage of the present State included only the Detroit area (Wayne County, Northwest Territory) and some persons at "Machilamackanack," Indiana Territory. Coverage in 1810, 1820, and 1830 expanded in the Lower Peninsula and included population in the strip that was ceded to Ohio in 1836. The 1820 and 1830 censuses also included some settlements in present-day Wisconsin, shown under that State. The 1840 census covered all parts of the State.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1800 comprises population reported for Wayne County, Northwest Territory (which may have included some persons in present-day northern Ohio), and for Machilamackanack, Indiana Territory (251 persons and 300 "boatmen from Canada, &c."). Total for 1820 excludes population (1,444) of Brown and Crawford Counties, and total for 1830 excludes population (3,635) of Brown, Crawford, and Iowa Counties, all enumerated in what is now Wisconsin. Total for 1890 includes 1 Indian in prison, not reported by county.
Note 2: Alpena's 1860-70 census boundaries were the same as those of 1890-1990.
Note 3: An earlier Crawford County was located in what is now Wisconsin and is shown under that State. Present-day Crawford County first was reported in 1880.
Note 4A: Dickinson: *Menominee, Iron, Marquette.
Note 4B: *Keweenaw; to Keweenaw.
Note 5: Keweenaw's 1870 census boundaries were the same as those of 1900-1990.
Note 6: The 1810 census was reported in terms of four Civil Districts of a single Wayne County: Michilimackinac, Detroit, Erie, and Huron. The 1810 population shown in the table for Mackinac County is that reported for Michilimackinac Civil District, for Macomb County that reported for Huron Civil District, for Monroe County that reported for Erie Civil District, and for Wayne County that reported for Detroit Civil District.
Note 7: Mackinac: 1800-1860: Michilimackinac (or variant spellings); for reasons of space, the counties referring to this county as origin give the name as Mackinac. See also notes 1 and 6.
Note 8: Manistee's 1860-70 census boundaries were the same as those of 1890-1990.
Note 9: Manitou: *Mackinac; to Charlevoix and Leelanau.
Note 10: Marquette: *Chippewa; Mackinac. 1870 population excludes 799 in Schoolcraft County, unorganized, reported as part of Marquette.
Note 11: Newaygo's 1850 census boundaries were the same as those of 1870-1990.
Note 12: The 1820 census boundaries of Oakland County did not include any of present-day Oakland County.
Note 13: Saginaw: *Oakland, St. Clair, St. Joseph.
Note 14: Wexford's 1870 census boundaries were the same as those of 1890-1990.

MINNESOTA NOTES
Northeastern Minnesota, east of the Mississippi River and a line drawn northward from its source to Canada, was part of the Northwest Territory (1787) and later of Indiana Territory (1800), Illinois Territory (1809), Michigan Territory (1818), and Wisconsin Territory (1838). Most of the rest of the State was part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, and included in Louisiana Territory (1805), renamed Missouri Territory in 1812. Both these parts of the present State were included in Michigan Territory from 1834 to 1836, and then in Wisconsin Territory until 1838. The portion west of the Mississippi then became part of Iowa Territory, until Minnesota Territory was established in 1849, including the whole present-day State and the Dakotas generally east of the Missouri River. Minnesota was admitted as a State on May 11, 1858 with essentially its present boundaries.
There was only limited census coverage of the present area of the State prior to 1850. In 1830 a few persons near Lake Superior may have been enumerated in Chippewa County, Michigan Territory; in 1840 some persons in northeastern Minnesota were enumerated in St. Croix County, Wisconsin Territory, and two settlements on the Mississippi River were enumerated as part of Clayton County, Iowa Territory. In 1850 coverage of Minnesota Territory did not extend beyond the present State except for a few settlers near the Red River in what is now North Dakota. In 1860 the census covered virtually the whole State.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1850 includes a few settlers near the Red River in what is now North Dakota. Total for 1890 includes population (8,457) of certain Indian reservations not returned by county. Total for 1900 includes population (3,486) of White Earth Indian Reservation, not returned by county, and returned in Becker, Clearwater, and Mahnomen Counties in 1910.
Note 2: Clearwater: also formed from area separately enumerated as White Earth Indian Reservation in 1900.
Note 3: The 1870 census area of old Lac qui Parle County was in Pierce in 1860 and in Swift and Chippewa in 1880. The current Lac qui Parle County was created in 1871 and does not include any of the earlier Lac qui Parle County.
Note 4: Mahkahta: to Cass, Otter Tail, Breckinridge (Clay), Becker, Todd, Toombs (Wilkin), Polk.
Note 5: Mahnomen: Corresponds to the portion of Norman enumerated in the White Earth Indian Reservation in 1900.
Note 6: Norman: The 1900 census boundaries are the same as those of 1910-1990 because of the separate reporting of the White Earth Indian Reservation in 1900.
Note 7: Pierce: To Big Stone, Stevens, Pope, Chippewa, Lac qui Parle (old); Traverse.
Note 8: Pipestone: Present-day Rock County was returned as Pipestone in 1860; present-day Pipestone had no population reported until 1880.
Note 9: Wahnata: to Pierce, Stearns, Todd, Otter Tail, Douglas, Toombs (Wilkin).

MISSISSIPPI NOTES
Most of present-day Mississippi was part of Georgia until the south-central portions of Mississippi and Alabama were established as Mississippi Territory, authorized by Congress in 1798 and agreed to by Georgia in 1802. In 1804, the Territory was expanded to include the northern parts of the two future States. The Gulf Coast portions were added in 1812, although still in dispute with Spain until 1819. Mississippi was admitted as a State on December 10, 1817 with essentially its present boundaries.
Census coverage of present-day Mississippi began in 1800 in the southwestern section close to the Mississippi River. The populations shown for 1800 and 1810 exclude counties now in Alabama. The central and northern portions were not fully covered by the census until 1840.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1800 excludes population (1,250) of Washington County, Mississippi Territory, nearly all of which is now in Alabama; total for 1810 excludes population (9,046) of Baldwin, Madison, and Washington Counties, Mississippi Territory, now entirely or mostly in Alabama. Mississippi's present-day Madison and Washington Counties were created in the 1820's.
Note 2: Calhoun: *Chickasaw, Yalobusha, Lafayette.
Note 3: Clay: *Chickasaw, Oktibbeha, Lowndes; Monroe.
Note 4: Grenada: *Yalobusha, Carroll, Tallahatchie, Choctaw.
Note 5: Hancock, Sunflower, Washington: Population for 1860 is that published in the 1860 report as "estimated".
Note 6: Humphreys: *Yazoo, Washington, Holmes, Sunflower.
Note 7: Lincoln: *Lawrence, Copiah, Franklin, Pike, Amite.
Note 8: Quitman: *Tunica, Tallahatchie, Panola, Coahoma.
Note 9: Tate: *DeSoto, Marshall; Tunica.
Note 10: Webster: *Choctaw, Chickasaw, Oktibbeha; 1880: Sumner.

MISSOURI NOTES
Missouri was acquired as part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and became part of Louisiana Territory, established in 1805 and comprising the whole of the Louisiana Purchase north of present-day Louisiana. This was renamed Missouri Territory in 1812. The southern portion (present-day Arkansas and most of Oklahoma) became Arkansas Territory in 1819. Missouri was admitted as a State on August 10, 1821; the northwestern corner (the Platte Purchase) was added in 1837, bringing the State to essentially its current boundaries.
In 1810, census coverage of Louisiana Territory was limited to portions of present-day Missouri and Arkansas, mainly close to the Mississippi River. The 1810 census was reported by districts (renamed counties in 1812); Arkansas District was entirely within present-day Arkansas and is shown under that State; New Madrid District also was partly within present-day Arkansas. In 1820, census coverage of Missouri Territory did not extend beyond present-day Missouri. After statehood in 1821, Missouri Territory, distinct from the State, continued to exist until 1854, but was almost entirely Indian lands and had virtually no census coverage.
County Notes:
Note 1: Areas reported in 1810 were districts, renamed counties in 1812. Total for 1810 is population of Louisiana Territory (20,845), excluding population (1,062) of Arkansas District, in present-day Arkansas; total includes New Madrid District, part of which was within present-day Arkansas. Total for 1890 includes 1 Indian in prison, not reported by county.
Note 2: Cass: *Jackson, Lafayette, Crawford; 1840: Van Buren.
Note 3: Franklin: *Ste. Genevieve, St. Louis, Cape Girardeau.
Note 4: Iron: *Madison, Washington, St. Francois; Wayne.
Note 5: St. Francois: *Ste. Genevieve, Washington, Jefferson.
Note 6: St. Louis city became independent of St. Louis County in 1876.
Note 7: Washington: *Ste. Genevieve, Cape Girardeau, St. Louis.

MONTANA NOTES
The eastern and central parts of Montana were acquired as early as the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, but had no organized government until Nebraska Territory was established in 1854. The northwestern part of Montana was included in the newly established Oregon Territory in 1848. The whole of the present-day State was included in Idaho Territory in 1863, and was established as a separate territory in 1864 with essentially its present boundaries. Montana was admitted as a State on November 8, 1889.
In 1860 census coverage of present-day Montana was limited to two forts enumerated in Nebraska Territory and some settlers in the Bitter Root Valley enumerated in Washington Territory. In 1870 census coverage included all of the present State.
County Notes:
Note 1: Totals for 1890 and 1900 include population of certain Indian reservations not reported by county (1890: 10,765; 1900: 2,660).
Note 2: The first Big Horn County was renamed Custer in 1877. The present Big Horn County was created in 1913.
Note 3: In 1890-1920, any population in the Montana portion of Yellowstone National Park was enumerated with the Wyoming portion.

NEBRASKA NOTES
Nebraska was acquired as part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and became part of Louisiana (later Missouri) Territory. It was established as a territory in 1854, including extensive areas northwest and west of the present State; it underwent various reductions in area in 1861 and 1863. Nebraska was admitted as a State on March 1, 1867, with nearly its present boundaries. Its last significant boundary change was the transfer of an area from Dakota Territory in 1882.
Census coverage of Nebraska began in 1860 in the eastern part of the present State. The 1860 census of Nebraska Territory also included scattered forts and settlements in present-day Wyoming and the Dakotas west of the Missouri River. Other such settlements in the portion of the Territory included in present-day Montana were reported with Dakota Territory, and those in present-day Colorado were reported with Colorado Territory, although these two territories were not established until 1861. By 1890, census coverage included the entire State. For a discussion of possible errors in the 1890 counts for Nebraska, see Edgar Z. Palmer, The Correctness of the 1890 Census of Population for Nebraska Cities (Nebraska History, Vol. XXXII, no. 4, December 1951, pages 259-267).
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1860 includes 2,118 persons in areas not organized by county, including Fort Randall (pop. 353) and other scattered forts and settlements in present-day Wyoming and the Dakotas west of the Missouri River. Total for 1870 includes 235 persons in areas not organized by county; total for 1880 includes 2,913 persons in such areas. Total for 1890 includes population (3,746) of certain Indian reservations not reported by county.
Note 2: Arthur was enumerated with McPherson in 1900-10.
Note 3: Boyd County was organized in 1891 but reported in 1890; it was formed mainly from territory ceded by South Dakota in 1882 (including most of the area reported as Todd County in 1880), with the remainder from unorganized territory.
Note 4: Grant (old): To Frontier, Lincoln, Red Willow, Hitchcock, Hayes, Furnas, Dawson, and Gosper.

NEVADA NOTES
Nevada was acquired from Mexico in 1848 and included in Utah and New Mexico Territories. It was established as a territory in 1861 from Utah Territory, and was admitted as a State on October 31, 1864. Nevada acquired essentially its present boundaries after annexation of the southern tip from Arizona Territory in 1866.
In 1850 present-day Nevada had no census coverage. The population for 1860 is for the enumerated portions of Utah Territory that were included in Nevada Territory the following year. In 1870 coverage included the entire State. The 1870 population includes Rio Virgin County, enumerated as part of Utah although located within Nevada.
County Notes:
Note 1: Areas shown for 1860 were then in Utah Territory. Total for 1870 includes population (450) of Rio Virgin County, enumerated as part of Utah although within Nevada. Total for 1890 includes population (1,594) of certain Indian reservations not reported by county.
Note 2: Carson: to Washoe, Storey, Ormsby (Carson City), Douglas, Esmeralda, Lyon, Roop, Humboldt, and Churchill.
Note 3: Rio Virgin County was established in 1869 by Utah within present- day Nevada and enumerated as part of Utah in 1870. Utah abolished the county in 1872; by 1880 its territory was in Lincoln County.
Note 4: Carson City was consolidated with Ormsby County in 1969 and became independent of any county; the populations for 1870-1960 are for Ormsby County.

NEW HAMPSHIRE NOTES
New Hampshire was one of the 13 original States. It has had essentially its present boundaries ever since 1790, although an area at the northern tip of the State was in dispute with Canada until 1842.
Census coverage included virtually all of New Hampshire from 1790 on.
County Notes:
Note 1: Merrimack: *Hillsborough, Rockingham; Strafford.

NEW JERSEY NOTES
New Jersey was one of the 13 original States, and has had essentially its current boundaries since Colonial times.
Census coverage included all parts of the State from 1790 on.
County Notes:
Note 1: Mercer: *Hunterdon, Middlesex, Burlington.

NEW MEXICO NOTES
New Mexico was acquired in part in 1845 when Texas joined the United States, and in part directly from Mexico in 1848 and 1853. New Mexico Territory was established in December 1850, including most of present-day Arizona and parts of Colorado and Nevada. New Mexico acquired essentially its present boundaries in 1863, and was admitted as a State on January 6, 1912.
In 1850 census coverage of New Mexico Territory included much of the present State but did not extend beyond it. The 1860 population refers essentially to the present State; it excludes the then Arizona County, which was located within present-day Arizona, as well as areas that became part of Colorado Territory in 1861.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1860 excludes 6,482 persons in Arizona County, within present-day Arizona. Total for 1890 includes population (6,689) of certain Indian reservations not reported by county.
Note 2: Cibola County (1980 pop. 30,347) was formed from Valencia County in 1981.

NEW YORK NOTES
New York was one of the 13 original States. Since relinquishing its claims to Vermont in 1791, it has had substantially its present boundaries.
Census coverage excluded Vermont in 1790, and did not include the far western part of the State until 1800.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1890 includes population (5,321) of certain Indian reservations, not reported by county.
Note 2: Allegany: *Steuben, Ontario.
Note 3: Bronx, Westchester: Bronx County was formed from New York County in 1912, comprising territory that had been annexed by New York County from Westchester County in 1874 and 1895. (Since 1898 this area also has comprised Bronx Borough of New York city.) The population of Bronx's present-day area was 200,507 in 1900 and 430,980 in 1910. According to the 1900 census, its estimated population at earlier censuses was: 1790, 1,781; 1800, 1,755; 1810, 2,267; 1820, 2,782; 1830, 3,023; 1840, 5,346; 1850, 8,032; 1860, 23,593; 1870, 37,393; 1880, 51,980; 1890, 88,908. Estimates consistent with these for the present-day area of Westchester are: 1790, 22,222; 1800, 25,618; 1810, 28,005; 1820, 29,856; 1830, 33,433; 1840, 43,340; 1850, 50,231; 1860, 75,904; 1870, 93,955, 1880, 98,634; 1890, 131,949.
Note 4: Clinton: In 1800 Essex was reported with Clinton.
Note 5: Delaware: *Ulster, Montgomery.
Note 6: Essex: *Clinton; in 1800 Essex was reported with Clinton.
Note 7: Franklin: *Clinton, Montgomery.
Note 8: Kings, Richmond: In 1898 Kings County and Richmond County, while remaining separate counties, became Brooklyn Borough and Richmond Borough, respectively, of New York city; Richmond Borough was renamed Staten Island Borough in 1975.
Note 9: Livingston: *Ontario, Genesee, Steuben.
Note 10: Monroe: *Genesee, Ontario.
Note 11: Nassau, Queens: In 1898 Nassau County was formed from Queens, the rest of which remained a county while becoming part of New York city (as Queens Borough). According to the 1900 census, the estimated population of Queens' present-day area at earlier censuses was: 1790, 15,014; 1800, 16,916; 1810, 19,336; 1820, 21,519; 1830, 22,460; 1840, 30,324; 1850, 36,833; 1860, 57,391; 1870, 73.803; 1880, 90,574; 1890, 128,059. Estimates consistent with these for the present-day area of Nassau are: 1790, 9,855; 1800, 10,274; 1810, 11,892; 1820, 13,273; 1830, 13,411; 1840, 15,844; 1850, 18,240; 1860, 24,488; 1870, 28,335; 1880, 34,015; 1890, 41,009.
Note 12: New York: From Colonial times to 1874 New York County was conterminous with New York city and had substantially the same area as present-day New York County. In 1874 and 1895, the county and city annexed portions of Westchester County. In 1912 the annexed portions became Bronx County (see note 2), leaving New York County with essentially its pre-1874 boundaries. The population of New York County's present-day area was: 1880, 1,164,673; 1890, 1,441,216; 1900: 1,850,093; 1910, 2,331,542. (Since 1898 this area also has comprised Manhattan Borough of New York city.) Also in 1898, Kings County (Brooklyn Borough), Richmond County (Richmond Borough, renamed Staten Island Borough in 1975) and part of Queens County (see note 5) became parts of New York City while remaining separate counties.
Note 13: Oswego: *Oneida, Onondaga.
Note 14: St. Lawrence: *Oneida, Montgomery, Herkimer.
Note 15: Schoharie: *Albany, Montgomery.
Note 16: Schuyler: *Tompkins, Steuben, Chemung.
Note 17: Steuben: *Ontario, Montgomery.
Note 18: Tompkins: *Seneca, Cayuga.
Note 19: Wayne: *Ontario, Seneca.
Note 20: Wyoming: *Genesee, Allegany.
Note 21: Yates: *Ontario, Steuben.

NORTH CAROLINA NOTES
North Carolina was one of the 13 original States and by the time of the 1790 census had essentially its current boundaries.
In 1790 census coverage included most of the State, except for areas at the western end, parts of which were not enumerated until 1840. The population for 1810 includes Walton County, enumerated as part of Georgia although actually within North Carolina.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1810 includes population (1,026) of Walton County, reported as a Georgia county but later determined to be situated in western North Carolina. Total for 1890 includes 2 Indians in prison, not reported by county.
Note 2: Alexander: *Iredell, Burke, Wilkes.
Note 3: Avery: *Caldwell, Mitchell, Watauga.
Note 4: Buncombe: *Burke, Rutherford; see also note 22.
Note 5: Caldwell: *Burke, Wilkes, Yancey.
Note 6: Cleveland: *Rutherford, Lincoln.
Note 7: Columbus: *Bladen, Brunswick.
Note 8: Dare: *Tyrrell, Currituck, Hyde.
Note 9: Hoke: *Cumberland, Robeson.
Note 10: Jackson: *Macon, Haywood.
Note 11: Lee: *Moore, Chatham.
Note 12: Lenoir: *Dobbs (Greene); Craven.
Note 13: McDowell: *Burke, Rutherford.
Note 14: Madison: *Buncombe, Yancey.
Note 15: Mitchell: *Yancey, Watauga.
Note 16: Pamlico: *Craven, Beaufort.
Note 17: Polk: *Rutherford, Henderson.
Note 18: Swain: *Jackson, Macon.
Note 19: Transylvania: *Henderson, Jackson.
Note 20: Union: *Mecklenburg, Anson.
Note 21: Vance: *Granville, Warren, Franklin.
Note 22: Walton: Created in 1803 as a Georgia county and reported in 1810 as part of Georgia; abolished after a review of the State boundary determined that its area was located in North Carolina. By 1820 it was part of Buncombe County.
Note 23: Watauga: *Ashe, Yancey, Wilkes; Burke.
Note 24: Wilson: *Edgecombe, Nash, Wayne, Johnston.
Note 25: Yancey: *Burke, Buncombe.

NORTH DAKOTA NOTES
North Dakota was admitted as a State on November 2, 1889 with essentially its present boundaries. It was formed from Dakota Territory, organized in 1861 (for Dakota's earlier history, see the State note for South Dakota).
In 1850 census coverage of present-day North Dakota was limited to a few settlements in what was then Minnesota Territory. In 1860, some forts and settlements in the present State were enumerated in Nebraska Territory as well as in Dakota, which was not yet organized. No determination has been made to assign the 1860 Dakota total of 4,837 to what became the two separate States. Census coverage first included the whole State in 1890.
The 1870 and 1880 populations consist of the totals of those counties of Dakota Territory located wholly or primarily in what is now North Dakota, plus (in 1870) an estimated portion of the Territory's unorganized part. The 1890 total includes the population (4,206) of the entire Standing Rock Indian Reservation, much of which was in South Dakota.
County Notes:
Note 1: Totals for 1870 and 1880 are the totals of those counties of Dakota Territory located wholly or primarily in what is now North Dakota; in addition, the 1870 total includes an estimated share (1,192) of the population of the Territory's unorganized portion (2,091). Total for 1890 includes the population (8,264) of certain Indian reservations not reported by county; this includes the population (4,206) of the entire Standing Rock Indian Reservation, much of which was in South Dakota. The 1890 total also includes the population (511) of the Fort Yates and Standing Rock Indian agency other than reservation Indians, likewise not reported by county. Total for 1900 includes the population (2,208) of the portion of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota, not reported by county.
Note 2: The 1890 area of Dunn was in Stark in 1900; the 1910 area of Dunn was in Stark and Mercer in 1900.
Note 3: The 1890 area of Hettinger was in Stark (and in small part Billings) in 1900; the 1910 area of Hettinger was in Stark in 1900.
Note 4: The 1890 area of McKenzie was in Billings in 1900; the 1910 area of McKenzie was in Billings and Stark in 1900.
Note 5: The 1890 area of Renville was in Ward and Bottineau in 1900; the 1910 area of Renville was in Ward in 1900.

OHIO NOTES
Ohio was part of the Territory Northwest of the River Ohio, established in 1787 and commonly known as the Northwest Territory. Besides present-day Ohio it included what are now Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and northeastern Minnesota. In 1800, with the creation of Indiana Territory, the Northwest Territory was reduced essentially to present-day Ohio, a small portion of southeastern Indiana, and the eastern half of lower Michigan. Ohio became a separate territory in 1802 and was admitted as a State on March 1, 1803, with its present boundaries except for a much-disputed strip along the northwestern border. This strip was governed by Michigan Territory until finally ceded to Ohio in 1836.
In 1790 the Northwest Territory had no census coverage. The 1800 census enumerated population in much of present-day Ohio and in a portion of southeastern Indiana; the total excludes the then Wayne County, nearly all of whose population was in present-day Michigan. The 1810, 1820, and 1830 censuses covered all of present-day Ohio except for the disputed northwestern strip, which was enumerated as part of Michigan.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1800 excludes population (3,206) of Wayne County, Northwest Territory, virtually all of which was enumerated in present-day Michigan, but includes part of present-day Indiana in Hamilton County. Total for 1890 includes 13 Indians in prison, not returned by county.
Note 2: Ashland: *Richland, Wayne, Lorain, Huron.
Note 3: Carroll: *Columbiana, Stark, Harrison, Tuscarawas, Jefferson.
Note 4: Clark: *Champaign, Greene, Madison.
Note 5: Cuyahoga: *Trumbull; 1800: Cayahoga.
Note 6: Defiance: *Williams, Henry, Paulding.
Note 7: Hardin: *Champaign, Delaware. In 1820 Hardin was reported as attached to Logan.
Note 8: Holmes: *Coshocton, Wayne, Tuscarawas.
Note 9: Jackson: *Ross, Scioto, Gallia, Athens.
Note 10: Lorain: *Medina, Huron, Cuyahoga.
Note 11: Lucas: *Wood, Henry, Monroe (MI), Huron.
Note 12: Mercer: *Montgomery. In 1820 Mercer was reported as attached to Darke.
Note 13: Monroe: *Belmont, Guernsey, Washington.
Note 14: Morgan: *Washington, Guernsey, Muskingum.
Note 15: Morrow: *Delaware, Knox, Marion, Richland.
Note 16: Noble: *Morgan, Guernsey, Monroe; Washington.
Note 17: Ottawa: *Sandusky, Monroe (MI), Huron.
Note 18: Perry: *Fairfield, Washington, Muskingum.
Note 19: Shelby: *Montgomery, Miami, Champaign.
Note 20: Union: *Delaware, Champaign, Madison, Franklin.
Note 21: Vinton: *Athens, Hocking, Jackson, Gallia, Ross.
Note 22: Wayne: Wayne County, Northwest Territory, reported in 1800, had virtually all its enumerated population in the Detroit area and hence is shown under Michigan. In 1810 the Ohio portion of its 1800 area was included in many Ohio counties, but it has not been shown as an origin because its Ohio portion was virtually unenumerated in 1800. The present Wayne County was organized in 1812.
Note 23: Wood: *Montgomery, Champaign; Delaware.
Note 24: Wyandot: *Crawford, Marion, Hancock, Hardin.

OKLAHOMA NOTES
Oklahoma was acquired by the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. It soon became an area of settlement for various Indian tribes displaced from States farther east, and was known as the Indian Territory although it had various tribal governments rather than a central administration. Many non-Indians also settled in the area. Oklahoma Territory was established from a part of the Indian Territory in 1890 and expanded in 1893; the tribal jurisdictions continued in the remainder. On November 16, 1907 the two parts were admitted as the State of Oklahoma, with substantially the current boundaries. A dispute about the western boundary was settled in Texas' favor by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1930.
Census coverage did not systematically include any of present-day Oklahoma until 1890; some Indian areas were first enumerated in 1900. In 1860 non-Indians were enumerated but not included in official population totals; non-Indians in the area in 1870 and 1880 were not enumerated. The 1890 total is for Oklahoma Territory (78,475) and Indian Territory (180,182); and the 1900 total is for Oklahoma Territory (398,331) and Indian Territory (392,060). Just prior to statehood, the U.S. Census Bureau took a special census on July 1, 1907, showing a total population of 1,414,177 (Oklahoma Territory, 733,062; Indian Territory, 681,115); results of this special census are included in the Oklahoma table.
County Notes:
Note 1: Population for 1890 is total of Oklahoma Territory (78,475, including 3,569 non-Indians on Indian reservations but not reported by reservation) and Indian Territory (180,182, including 861 not reported by nation or reservation). Population for 1900 is total of Oklahoma Territory (398,331) and Indian Territory (392,060).
Note 2: Population for 1907 is total according to special census of Oklahoma Territory (733,062) and Indian Territory (681,115, including 9,155 not reported by nation or reservation) taken as of July 1, 1907. The 1907 data are given both for the subdivisions of Indian Territory existing on July 1 and for the counties into which the new State was divided later in that year.
Note 3: Caddo: *Wichita and Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Reservations.
Note 4: Day: *Cheyenne and Arapaho Reservation; to Ellis and Roger Mills.
Note 5: Grady: *Chickasaw Nation and Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Reservation.
Note 6: Greer functioned as a Texas county until 1896 but was enumerated as part of Oklahoma Territory in 1890.
Note 7: Jefferson: *Chickasaw Nation and Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Reservation.
Note 8: Noble: Total for 1900 excludes population (2,217) of Ponca and Otoe and Missouri Reservations, reported as part of the county.
Note 9: Osage: The 1890-1900 census boundaries of the Osage Reservation were essentially the same as those of Osage County, 1907-90.
Note 10: Ottawa: *Modoc, Ottawa, Peoria, Quapaw, Shawnee, Wyandotte, and Seneca Reservations and Cherokee Nation.
Note 11: Pottawatomie: *Pottawatomie, Kickapoo, and Sac and Fox Reservations.
Note 12: Stephens: *Chickasaw Nation and Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Reservation.
Note 13: Cheyenne and Arapaho Reservation: To Blaine, Canadian, Custer, Day, Dewey, Kingfisher, Roger Mills, Washita.
Note 14: Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Reservation: To Caddo, Comanche, Grady, Jefferson, Kiowa, Stephens, Tillman.
Note 15: Wichita Reservation: To Caddo, Blaine, Canadian, Custer, Grady, Washita.
Note 16: Cherokee Nation: To Adair, Cherokee, Craig, Delaware, McIntosh, Mayes, Muskogee, Nowata, Ottawa, Rogers, Sequoyah, Tulsa, Wagoner, Washington.
Note 17: Chickasaw Nation: To Bryan, Carter, Coal, Garvin, Grady, Jefferson, Johnston, Love, McClain, Marshall, Murray, Pontotoc, Stephens.
Note 18: Choctaw Nation: To Atoka, Bryan, Choctaw, Coal, Haskell, Hughes, Johnston, Latimer, Leflore, McCurtain, Pittsburg, Pontotoc, Pushmataha.
Note 19: Creek Nation: To Creek, Hughes, McIntosh, Mayes, Muskogee, Okfuskee, Okmulgee, Rogers, Seminole, Tulsa, Wagoner.

OREGON NOTES
The Oregon region was long in dispute with Great Britain, and was jointly occupied by the two countries until definitively acquired by the United States in 1846. Oregon was established as a territory in 1848, including present-day Washington, Idaho, and parts of Montana and Wyoming. It acquired its present boundaries and was admitted as a State on February 14, 1859.
In 1850 the census covered only areas west of the Cascade Mountains; the 1850 total excludes persons enumerated in present-day Washington. In 1860 census coverage included the whole State.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1850 excludes population (1,201) of Clark and Lewis Counties, located in present-day Washington. Total for 1890 includes population (3,937) of certain Indian reservations not reported by county.

PENNSYLVANIA NOTES
Pennsylvania was one of the 13 original States. In 1792 the acquisition of the Erie Triangle at its northwest corner brought it to essentially its present boundaries.
In 1790 census coverage included all parts of the present State except for the Erie Triangle.
County Notes:
Note 1: Armstrong: *Northumberland, Westmoreland, Allegheny.
Note 2: Beaver: *Allegheny, Washington.
Note 3: Blair: *Huntingdon, Bedford.
Note 4: Bradford: *Luzerne, Lycoming.
Note 5: Cambria: *Somerset, Huntingdon.
Note 6: Cameron: *McKean, Clinton, Elk, Potter.
Note 7: Carbon: *Northampton, Monroe.
Note 8: Centre: *Mifflin, Northumberland, Huntingdon; in 1800 Centre was reported with Mifflin.
Note 9: Clarion: *Armstrong, Venango.
Note 10: Clearfield: *Lycoming, Huntingdon.
Note 11: Clinton: *Lycoming, Centre.
Note 12: Columbia: *Northumberland.
Note 13: Elk: *Clearfield, Jefferson, McKean.
Note 14: Forest: *Jefferson; in 1850 Forest was reported with Jefferson.
Note 15: Indiana: *Westmoreland, Lycoming.
Note 16: Jefferson: *Lycoming; in 1850 Forest was reported with Jefferson.
Note 17: Lawrence: *Mercer, Beaver.
Note 18: Lebanon: *Dauphin, Lancaster.
Note 19: Northumberland: *Lycoming.
Note 20: Monroe: *Northampton, Pike.
Note 21: Schuylkill: *Berks, Northampton, Northumberland, Luzerne.
Note 22: Union: *Northumberland.
Note 23: Venango: *Northumberland, Allegheny.
Note 24: Warren: *Allegheny, Northumberland; total for 1890 includes population (99) of Cornplanter Indian Reservation, reported separately.

RHODE ISLAND NOTES
Rhode Island was one of the 13 original States and has had nearly its present boundaries since Colonial times. However, a long-standing boundary dispute with Massachusetts involved a sizable exchange of territory when finally settled by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1862.
Census coverage included all of Rhode Island from 1790 on.
County Notes:
Note 1: Newport, Washington: New Shoreham town (Block Island; 1960 pop. 486) was transferred from Newport County to Washington County in 1963.

SOUTH CAROLINA NOTES
South Carolina was one of the 13 original States. By the time of the 1790 census it had essentially its current boundaries, with some later adjustments following improved surveys.
The census has covered all of the State ever since 1790, except for a narrow strip of Indian lands on the northwestern border, first enumerated in 1820. The 1790 census was not completed in South Carolina until early 1792.
County Notes:
Note 1: In 1790 South Carolina was divided into seven districts, two of which were reported by subdivisions termed counties. The populations of four of the other five districts (Beaufort, Charleston, Georgetown, Orangeburg) are shown in the table in Part III for the counties of the same names; the population of Cheraws District is shown for Marlboro County. For 1800, the populations reported for Chesterfield, Darlington, and Marlboro subdivisions of Cheraw District are shown in the table for the counties of the same names; all three became separate districts by 1810. Otherwise, the populations shown for 1800 through 1860 are those reported for districts; besides Cheraw, a few other districts contained subdivisions called counties, but these are not shown in the table. All districts were redesignated counties in 1868.
Note 2: Aiken: *Barnwell, Edgefield, Lexington, Orangeburg.
Note 3: Allendale: *Barnwell, Hampton.
Note 4: Beaufort: 1790: Beaufort District.
Note 5: Calhoun: *Orangeburg, Lexington.
Note 6: Charleston: 1790: Charleston District.
Note 7: Cherokee: *Spartanburg, Union, York.
Note 8: Chesterfield: *Cheraws (Marlboro); see also note 1.
Note 9: Clarendon: Reported as part of Sumter District from 1810 through 1850.
Note 10: Colleton: *Charleston District.
Note 11: Darlington: *Cheraws (Marlboro) District; see also note 1.
Note 12: Florence: *Marion, Darlington, Williamsburg, Clarendon.
Note 13: Georgetown: 1790: Georgetown District.
Note 14: Greenwood: *Abbeville, Edgefield.
Note 15: Jasper: *Beaufort, Hampton.
Note 16: Kershaw: *Lancaster, Richland, Claremont (Sumter), Fairfield.
Note 17: Lee: *Sumter, Kershaw, Darlington.
Note 18: McCormick: *Abbeville, Edgefield, Greenwood.
Note 19: Marlboro: 1790: Cheraws District; see also note 1.
Note 20: Orangeburg: 1790: Orangeburg District.
Note 21: Pendleton: To Anderson and Pickens.
Note 22: Sumter: 1790: Claremont.

SOUTH DAKOTA NOTES
Most of present-day North and South Dakota was acquired as part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, and was included in Louisiana (soon renamed Missouri) Territory. The part generally west of the Missouri River remained in Missouri Territory until becoming part of Nebraska Territory, formed in 1854. The portion east of the Missouri because successively part of Michigan Territory (1834), Wisconsin Territory (1836), Iowa Territory (1838), and Minnesota Territory (1849). After Minnesota became a State in 1858, this area remained unorganized until Dakota Territory was established in 1861, including all of the present-day Dakotas as well as most of Montana and the northern half of Wyoming. After 1868 Dakota Territory corresponded to the present two States, plus an area transferred to Nebraska in 1882. South Dakota (like North Dakota) was admitted as a State on November 2, 1889 with essentially its present boundaries.
Present-day South Dakota had no census coverage in 1850. The population given for 1860 is for the whole of Dakota Territory as organized in 1861, essentially comprising present-day South and North Dakota east of the Missouri River; no determination has been made to assign the 1860 total to what became the two separate States. In 1860, some forts and settlements in the present State also were enumerated in Nebraska Territory. The 1870 and 1880 populations consist of the totals of those counties of Dakota Territory located wholly or primarily in what is now South Dakota, plus (in 1870) an estimated portion of the Territory's unorganized part. The total population of Dakota Territory was 14,181 in 1870 and 135,177 in 1880. Considerable portions of the State were not covered by the census until 1900.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1860 is for entire Dakota Territory as organized in 1861, essentially comprising present-day South and North Dakota east of the Missouri River. Totals for 1870 and 1880 are totals of those counties of Dakota Territory located wholly or primarily in what is now South Dakota; in addition, 1870 total includes an estimated share (899) of the population of the Territory's unorganized portion (2,091). Certain Indian reservations not reported by county in 1880, 1890, or 1900 are shown as separate entries after the counties; only one of these was enumerated in 1880. Total for 1890 includes 4 Indians in prison, not reported by county or reservation. In 1890 the population (4,206) of the entire Standing Rock Indian Reservation was credited to North Dakota, although much of it was in South Dakota.
Note 2: Armstrong: *Stanley; reported in 1890 (as Pyatt) and 1900 although largely included with Cheyenne River Indian Reservation; reported in 1910; enumerated with Ziebach in 1920; reported in 1930- 50; annexed to Dewey in 1954. (An earlier Armstrong County was created after 1870 and was part of Hutchinson County by 1880.)
Note 3: Charles Mix: Total for 1890 includes population (1,838) of Yankton Indian Reservation, reported separately.
Note 4: Day: Total for 1880 includes population (134) of Fort Sisseton, reported separately.
Note 5: Dewey: Reported in 1880 (as Rusk); included with Cheyenne River and Standing Rock Indian Reservations in 1890- 1900; reported in 1910-90.
Note 6: Harding: Created before 1890 (*Butte); to Butte in 1899; again created before 1910 (*Butte).
Note 7: Jackson: Created before 1890, when part was included with Pine Ridge and Rosebud Indian Reservations; reported portion to Stanley by 1900; again created before 1920 (*Stanley).
Note 8: Shannon: Created before 1880; included with Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in 1890-1910; reported in 1920-90.
Note 9: Sterling: Reported in 1890; reported portion to Stanley by 1900; remainder included with Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in 1890-1900; reported in 1910; annexed to Ziebach in 1911.
Note 10: Todd (old): Created before 1870; most was transferred to Nebraska in 1882, mainly to what was reported as Boyd County in 1890; remainder annexed to Gregory in 1899.
Note 11: Washington: Reported in 1890, although mostly included with Pine Ridge Indian Reservation; reported portion (*Shannon) to Pennington by 1900; included with Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in 1900-10; reported in 1920-40; annexed to Shannon in 1943.
Note 12: Ziebach (old): Reported in 1890; annexed to Pennington in 1899.
Note 13: Cheyenne River Indian Reservation: Reported in 1890- 1900, including most of 1880 area of Rusk; its area was reported in 1910 in Dewey, Armstrong, Schnasse, and Sterling.
Note 14: Crow Creek Indian Reservation: Reported in 1890; its 1890 area was reported in 1880 in Buffalo and Hughes, and in 1900 in Hughes, Buffalo, and Hyde. The 1890 population includes 86 non-Indians enumerated on the Crow Creek and Lower Brule reservations but not reported separately for the two.
Note 15: Lower Brule Indian Reservation: Reported in 1890; its area was reported in 1900 in Lyman and Stanley. See also note 14.
Note 16: Pine Ridge Indian Reservation:: Reported in 1890-1910; its area included most of the 1880 area of Shannon, and was reported in 1920 in Shannon, Bennett, Washington, and Washabaugh.
Note 17: Rosebud Indian Reservation: Reported in 1890-1900; its area included the 1880 area of Meyer, and was reported in 1910 in Tripp, Gregory, Todd, Mellette, Bennett, and Washabaugh.
Note 18: Sisseton and Wahpeton Indian Reservation: Reported in 1880, and in 1890 (as Lake Traverse Indian Reservation); its area was reported in 1900 in Roberts, Marshall, Day, and Grant.
Note 19: Standing Rock Indian Reservation (part): Reported in 1900; its area was reported as Corson County in 1910. The remaining part of the reservation is in North Dakota, and in 1890 the population (4,206) of the entire reservation was credited to that State.

TENNESSEE NOTES
The Territory South of the Ohio River, formerly part of North Carolina and sometimes known as the Southwest Territory, was created in 1790. It was admitted as the State of Tennessee on June 1, 1796. Both Territory and State had generally the same boundaries as the present State, except that because of erroneous surveys much of the Tennessee-Kentucky boundary was in dispute for some time; it was not finally resurveyed until 1859. Details of the Tennessee-Virginia boundary were not settled until 1901.
Census coverage in 1790 and 1800 was limited to the northeastern part of Tennessee and the region around Nashville, and coverage did not include the whole State until 1830. The 1790 census of the Southwest Territory actually began at the end of July 1791.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1790 is for the Territory South of the Ohio River (Southwest Territory), with generally the same boundaries as the present State.
Note 2: Anderson: *Knox; Grainger.
Note 3: Cannon: *Warren, Wilson, Rutherford, Smith.
Note 4: Cheatham: *Davidson, Robertson, Montgomery.
Note 5: Chester: *McNairy, Henderson, Madison, Hardeman.
Note 6: Claiborne: *Grainger, Hawkins.
Note 7: Clay: *Jackson, Overton.
Note 8: Cocke: *Jefferson; in 1800 Cocke was reported with Jefferson.
Note 9: Coffee: *Franklin, Warren, Bedford.
Note 10: Crockett: *Haywood, Gibson, Madison, Dyer.
Note 11: Cumberland: *Morgan, Bledsoe, White; Overton, Fentress, Roane.
Note 12: Decatur: *Perry, Henderson.
Note 13: DeKalb: *Warren, Smith, White.
Note 14: Dickson: *Robertson, Montgomery.
Note 15: Fentress: *Morgan, Overton, Campbell.
Note 16: Grundy: *Warren, Coffee.
Note 17: Hamblen: *Jefferson, Grainger, Hawkins.
Note 18: Hamilton County's 1840-70 census boundaries were essentially the same as those of 1920-90.
Note 19: Hancock: *Hawkins, Claiborne.
Note 20: Houston: *Stewart, Dickson, Humphreys.
Note 21: James: *Hamilton; to Hamilton (1919).
Note 22: Jefferson: *Greene, Hawkins; in 1800 Cocke was reported with Jefferson.
Note 23: Knox: *Hawkins, Greene.
Note 24: Lauderdale: *Tipton, Dyer; Haywood.
Note 25: Lawrence: *Giles, Hickman.
Note 26: Lewis: *Hickman, Maury, Lawrence, Wayne.
Note 27: Loudon: *Monroe, Roane, Blount.
Note 28: Macon: *Smith, Sumner.
Note 29: Marshall: *Bedford, Lincoln, Maury.
Note 30: Montgomery: 1790: Tennessee.
Note 31: Moore: *Lincoln, Franklin.
Note 32: Morgan: *Roane, Anderson, Overton.
Note 33: Pickett: *Fentress, Overton.
Note 34: Putnam: *Jackson, White, Overton, DeKalb.
Note 35: Robertson: *Tennessee (Montgomery), Sumner.
Note 36: Rutherford: *Wilson, Davidson; Williamson.
Note 37: Scott: *Campbell, Morgan, Anderson, Fentress.
Note 38: Sequatchie: *Marion, Grundy, Bledsoe.
Note 39: Sevier: The population shown for 1790 was reported for "South of French Broad [River]". Sevier County was created in 1794.
Note 40: Trousdale: *Sumner, Smith; Macon, Wilson.
Note 41: Unicoi: *Washington, Carter.
Note 42: Union: *Grainger, Claiborne, Knox, Campbell, Anderson.
Note 43: Van Buren: *White, Warren.
Note 44: Wayne: *Humphreys, Hickman.

TEXAS NOTES
Texas was part of Mexico until its revolution in 1835-36 made it an independent republic, with a territory somewhat larger than the present State. It became part of the United States and was admitted as a State on December 29, 1845. It reached essentially its present boundaries in 1850, after the sale to the United States of an extensive northwestern area. In 1896 a long-standing dispute over what is now Greer County, Oklahoma was decided against Texas by the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1930 a Supreme Court decision transferred from Oklahoma to Texas a narrow strip on the eastern side of the Texas Panhandle. Beginning in 1905, international treaties and conventions have exchanged small tracts along the Rio Grande with Mexico, notably in and adjacent to the city of El Paso.
Census coverage of eastern Texas began in 1850, although in 1820 and 1830 the census counts for (old) Miller County, Arkansas Territory, included some people in what is now Texas. By 1880 census coverage included the entire State.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1890 includes 4 Indians in prison, not reported by county, but excludes population (5,338) of Greer County, enumerated as part of Oklahoma although claimed by Texas from 1860 to 1896.
Note 2: Aransas County's 1880 census boundaries were virtually the same as those of 1900-90.
Note 3: Bexar District, an unorganized territory, was formed after 1860; by 1880 its 1870 area was part of Tom Green, Crockett, Martin, Howard, Mitchell, Nolan, Fisher, Scurry, Borden, Dawson, and Gaines.
Note 4: Cameron, Encinal, Starr, Webb, Zapata: In 1850 Starr and Webb (including areas subsequently in Encinal and Zapata) were reported with Cameron.
Note 5: The first Dawson County was formed before 1860 and divided between Kinney and Uvalde in 1866. The present Dawson County was created in 1876.
Note 6: Kenedy, Willacy: Kenedy County, formed in 1911, was named Willacy until 1921. The present Willacy County was formed in 1921 from Cameron and Hidalgo with a small part from Kenedy (old Willacy).
Note 7: San Patricio's 1860-80 census boundaries were virtually the same as those of 1900-1990.

UTAH NOTES
Utah was acquired from Mexico in 1848 and established as a territory in September 1850, including most of present-day Nevada and western Colorado. Colorado and Nevada were separated in 1861, with further transfers from Utah to Nevada in 1862 and 1866. Utah acquired its present boundaries in 1868, and was admitted as a State on January 4, 1896.
Utah's 1850 census was taken as of April 1, 1851 and included almost no population outside the present State. The 1860 population includes some persons in present-day Wyoming, but excludes counties located in present-day Nevada. The 1870 population excludes Rio Virgin County, which was part of Nevada although enumerated as part of Utah.
County Notes:
Note 1: The census date for the 1850 census in Utah was April 1, 1851. Total for 1860 excludes population (6,857) in counties that subsequently became part of Nevada. Total for 1870 excludes population (450) of Rio Virgin County, in Nevada though enumerated as part of Utah. Total for 1890 includes population (2,874) of certain Indian reservations not reported by county.
Note 2: Cedar County was abolished in 1862; in 1870 its former area was reported mainly in Utah County, with limited areas in Tooele, Juab, and Salt Lake Counties.
Note 3: The area of Green River County enumerated in 1860 was in Wyoming Territory by 1870.

VERMONT NOTES
In 1777 Vermont declared itself separate from New Hampshire and New York, but both continued to claim it. After New York withdrew its claims, Vermont was admitted as a State on March 4, 1791 with essentially its present boundaries.
Vermont's 1790 census actually took place after statehood in 1791. Census coverage included virtually all settled portions of the State.
County Notes:
Note 1: Data for 1790 are from census taken in 1791.
Note 2: Grand Isle: *Franklin, Chittenden.
Note 3: Lamoille: *Franklin, Orleans, Washington, Chittenden.
Note 4: Orleans: *Chittenden, Orange.
Note 5: Washington: *Chittenden, Orange, Caledonia.

VIRGINIA NOTES
Virginia was one of the 13 original States. Kentucky was part of Virginia until 1792, and a small part of Virginia was included in the District of Columbia from 1791 to 1846. West Virginia was separated from Virginia in 1862, becoming a State in 1863 and adding two more counties in 1866. Since then Virginia's boundaries have remained essentially unchanged, with slight modifications as early surveys were reviewed and corrected. Details of the Virginia-Tennessee boundary were not settled until 1901.
In 1790 census coverage included all of Virginia's present-day territory; Kentucky was reported separately. The populations for 1800-1840 include the area that was then part of the District of Columbia, and the populations for 1790-1860 exclude the counties entirely or primarily included in what is now West Virginia.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1800 includes 48 persons not credited to any county. Totals for 1790-1860 exclude counties wholly or primarily in what is now West Virginia (1790: 55,873; 1800: 78,592; 1810: 105,469; 1820: 136,808; 1830: 176,924; 1840: 224,537; 1850: 302,313; 1860: 376,688). The information on county formations specifies (WV) when referring to counties that primarily became part of West Virginia.
Note 2: State totals for 1800-1840 include population of the portion of the District of Columbia taken from Virginia (Fairfax County) in 1791 but retroceded to Virginia in 1846 (1800: 5,949; 1810: 8.852; 1820: 9.703; 1830: 9,573; 1840: 9,967). This area became Alexandria County in 1801; a portion was reported as Alexandria city independent of the county beginning in 1900; Alexandria County was renamed Arlington in 1920.
Note 3: In Virginia, when a town becomes a city it also becomes independent of its county. The table lists these independent cities separately after the counties. Although some cities operated independently of any county much earlier, census publications did not consistently report independent cities as separate from counties until 1890. Many new independent cities have been created since then, and there also have been numerous annexations from counties to cities. Several former counties have disappeared through annexation to cities, or through the whole county becoming a city. In spite of their names, the counties named Charles City, James City, and (until 1952) Elizabeth City are counties, not independent cities. Persons interested in population changes over time often prefer to combine the Virginia independent cities with an adjacent county, to eliminate or reduce the effect of the numerous county/city boundary changes. The last section of the table gives data for those counties from which a city has been formed or primarily formed, combining populations for the county and the city or cities. Notes for the cities are numbered starting with C1; they specify the county or counties from which the city originally was formed. In five cases (the cities of Hampton, Newport News, Suffolk, Virginia Beach, and the combined cities of Norfolk, Chesapeake, and Portsmouth) the combined area is listed with the name of a city, as explained in individual notes.
Note 4: Alleghany: *Botetourt, Bath, Monroe (WV). See also notes C7 and C9.
Note 5: Amelia, Nottoway: Nottoway was reported with Amelia in 1790.
Note 6: Appomattox: *Buckingham, Campbell, Prince Edward, Charlotte.
Note 7: Augusta: See notes C37 and C40.
Note 8: Bath: *Augusta, Botetourt, Greenbrier (WV).
Note 9: Bedford: See notes C2 and C21.
Note 10: Bland: *Wythe, Tazewell, Giles.
Note 11: Botetourt's 1860 census boundaries were essentially the same as those of 1890-1990. See also note 22.
Note 12: Buchanan: *Tazewell, Russell.
Note 13: Carroll: *Grayson; see note C16.
Note 14: Chesterfield: See notes C8, C23, C28, and C32.
Note 15: Craig: *Botetourt, Giles, Roanoke, Monroe (WV).
Note 16: Dickenson: *Buchanan, Wise, Russell.
Note 17: Elizabeth City: See notes C17 and C25.
Note 18: Fairfax: 1960 corrected population 262,482 (including Falls Church city, 272,674). See also notes C1, C12, and C13.
Note 19: Giles: *Montgomery, Tazewell, Wythe.
Note 20: Grayson: *Montgomery, Washington; see note C16.
Note 21: Highland: *Bath, Pendleton (WV).
Note 22: Montgomery, Wythe, Botetourt: Wythe was reported in 1790 as part of Montgomery and Botetourt. See also note C31.
Note 23: Norfolk: See notes C6, C26, and C30.
Note 24: Nottoway: *Amelia; reported with Amelia in 1790.
Note 25: Page: *Shenandoah, Rockingham.
Note 26: Prince George: See notes C19 and C28.
Note 27: Princess Anne: See notes C26 and C39.
Note 28: Pulaski: *Montgomery, Wythe.
Note 29: Richmond, Westmoreland: Westmoreland was reported with Richmond in 1800. Westmoreland's 1790 census boundaries were the same as those of 1810-1990.
Note 30: Roanoke: *Botetourt; Montgomery. See also notes C33 and C34.
Note 31: Rockbridge: See notes C4 and C20.
Note 32: Scott: *Russell, Lee, Washington.
Note 33: Smyth: *Washington, Wythe.
Note 34: Tazewell: *Montgomery, Russell.
Note 35: Warren: *Frederick, Shenandoah.
Note 36: Wise: *Russell, Scott, Lee; see note C27.
Note 37: Wythe: *Montgomery, Russell; see note 22.
Note 38: York: See notes C29 and C41.
Note 39: Allegheny/cities: *Botetourt, Bath, Monroe (WV). See also notes C7 and C9.
Note 40: Augusta/cities: See notes C37 and C40.
Note 41: Bedford/city: See notes C2 and C21.
Note 42: Carroll/city: *Grayson; see note C16.
Note 43: Chesterfield/city: See notes C8, C23, C28, and C32.
Note 44: Fairfax/cities: See notes 18, C1, C12, and C13.
Note 45: Hampton city/county: See notes C17 and C25.
Note 46: Montgomery/city: See notes 22 and C31.
Note 47: Prince George/cities: See notes C19 and C28.
Note 48: Roanoke/cities: *Botetourt, Montgomery; see notes C33 and C34.
Note 49: Including its associated independent cities, Rockbridge's 1860 census boundaries were essentially the same as those of 1890-1990. See also notes C4 and C20.
Note 50: Virginia Beach city/county: See notes C26 and C39.
Note 51: Wise/city: *Russell, Scott, Lee; see note C27.
Note 52: York/city: See notes C29 and C41.
Independent Cities
Note C1: Alexandria city, formed from Alexandria (now Arlington) County; has also annexed much territory from Fairfax County.
Note C2: Bedford city, formed from Bedford County (1968).
Note C3: Bristol city, formed from Washington County. Annexation after 1970 from Washington (1970 population 4,802).
Note C4: Buena Vista city, formed from Rockbridge County. Annexation after 1980 from Rockbridge (1980 population 187).
Note C5: Charlottesville city, formed from Albemarle County.
Note C6: Chesapeake city, formed through combination of Norfolk County and South Norfolk city (1963); see note C26.
Note C7: Clifton Forge city, formed from Alleghany County (1906).
Note C8: Colonial Heights city, formed from Chesterfield County (1948). Some users prefer to combine it with adjacent Petersburg city and Dinwiddie County.
Note C9: Covington city, formed from Alleghany County (1952).
Note C10: Danville city, formed from Pittsylvania County. Annexation after 1980 from Pittsylvania (1980 population 11,007).
Note C11: Emporia city, formed from Greensville County (1967). Annexation after 1980 from Greensville (1980 population 1,234).
Note C12: Fairfax city, formed from Fairfax County (1961). Annexation after 1980 from Fairfax County (1980 population 1,147).
Note C13: Falls Church city, formed from Fairfax County (1948).
Note C14: Franklin city, formed from Southampton County (1961). Annexation after 1980 from Southampton (1980 population 415).
Note C15: Fredericksburg city, formed from Spotsylvania County. Annexation after 1980 from Spotsylvania (1980 population 2,440).
Note C16: Galax city, formed almost equally from Carroll and Grayson Counties (1953); combined in the table with Carroll County.
Note C17: Hampton city, formed from Elizabeth City County (1908). The remainder of the county was annexed to the city in 1952; the city/county combination is listed under Hampton.
Note C18: Harrisonburg city, formed from Rockingham County (1916). Annexation after 1980 from Rockingham (1980 population 4,984).
Note C19: Hopewell city, formed from Prince George County (1916).
Note C20: Lexington city, formed from Rockbridge County (1966).
Note C21: Lynchburg city, formed from Campbell County; has annexed some territory from Bedford County. Annexations after 1970 from Campbell (1970 population 9,033) and Bedford (1,467).
Note C22: Manassas city and Manassas Park city, formed from Prince William County (1975); 1970 populations 10,758 and 6,844 respectively.
Note C23: Manchester city, formed from Chesterfield County, but annexed to Richmond city in 1910.
Note C24: Martinsville city, formed from Henry County (1929).
Note C25: Newport News city, formed from Warwick County, with some annexations from Elizabeth City County (now Hampton city). The remainder of Warwick County became Warwick city in 1952 and then was annexed to Newport News city in 1958; the city/county combination is listed under Newport News.
Note C26: Norfolk city, formed from Norfolk County, with some annexations from Princess Anne County. The cities of Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Chesapeake and the former Norfolk County and South Norfolk city are listed as a single city/county combination under Norfolk.
Note C27: Norton city, formed from Wise County (1954).
Note C28: Petersburg city, formed mainly from Dinwiddie County (1880 population 19,151); also included territory from Chesterfield County (1,312) and Prince George County (1,193). Annexations after 1970 from Prince George (1970 population 4,721) and Dinwiddie (3,378).
Note C29: Poquoson city, formed from York County (1975); 1970 population 5,441.
Note C30: Portsmouth city, formed from Norfolk County; see note C26.
Note C31: Radford city, formed from Montgomery County. Annexations from Montgomery after 1970 (1970 population 344) and after 1980 (1980 population 231).
Note C32: Richmond city, formed from Henrico County, but has annexed much territory from Chesterfield County; annexed Manchester city (originally formed from Chesterfield) in 1910.
Note C33: Roanoke city, formed from Roanoke County. Annexation after 1970 from Roanoke County (1970 population 13,522).
Note C34: Salem city, formed from Roanoke County (1968).
Note C35: South Boston city, formed from Halifax County (1960).
Note C36: South Norfolk city, formed from Norfolk County (1921); with the remainder of Norfolk County, formed Chesapeake city in 1963; see note C26.
Note C37: Staunton city, formed from Augusta County. Annexation after 1980 from Augusta (1980 population 2,980).
Note C38: Suffolk city, formed from Nansemond County. The remainder of the county became Nansemond city in 1972 and then was annexed to Suffolk city in 1974; the city/county combination is listed under Suffolk.
Note C39: Virginia Beach city, formed from Princess Anne County (1952). The remainder of the county was annexed to the city in 1963; the city/county combination is listed under Virginia Beach.
Note C40: Waynesboro city, formed from Augusta County (1948). Annexation after 1980 from Augusta (1980 population 3,234).
Note C41: Williamsburg city, formed from James City County, but also includes territory from York County. Annexation after 1980 from James City County (1980 population 424).
Note C42: Winchester city, formed from Frederick County. Annexation after 1970 from Frederick (1970 population 4,786).

WASHINGTON NOTES
After a period when Great Britain also claimed it, Washington was definitively acquired in 1846 and was included in Oregon Territory, established in 1848. Washington became a separate territory in 1853, acquired essentially its present boundaries in 1863, and was admitted as a State on November 11, 1889.
The 1850 population is that of Clark and Lewis Counties, Oregon Territory; census coverage extended only to the southwestern part of present-day Washington. In 1860 census coverage included nearly the whole present State, and some persons in present-day northern Idaho and northwestern Montana.
County Notes:
Note 1: Areas shown for 1850 were then in Oregon Territory. Total for 1890 includes population (7,842) of certain Indian reservations not reported by county.
Note 2: The San Juan Islands were in dispute with Great Britain until 1872, and were reported in the 1870 census as "the disputed islands." San Juan County was formed in 1873.
Note 3: The first Spokane County was renamed Stevens in 1864. The present Spokane County was formed from Stevens after 1870.

WEST VIRGINIA NOTES
West Virginia was admitted as a State on June 20, 1863, comprising 48 counties formerly part of Virginia; two additional counties, Berkeley and Jefferson, were added in 1866, bringing the State to essentially its present boundaries.
Census coverage included all parts of the present State from 1790 on.
County Notes:
Note 1: Populations for 1790-1850 are totals of the Virginia counties that were wholly or primarily within the present-day boundaries of West Virginia; populations at these censuses are not available for the exact present area of the State, because some Virginia counties extended across the current State line. Population for 1860 is the total of the 50 Virginia counties that formed West Virginia in 1863 and 1866, and does refer to the present area of the State. The information on county formations specifies (VA) when referring to counties that remained primarily in Virginia.
Note 2: Barbour: *Randolph, Harrison, Lewis.
Note 3: Boone: *Kanawha, Logan; Cabell.
Note 4: Braxton: *Nicholas, Lewis, Kanawha.
Note 5: Clay: *Nicholas, Braxton.
Note 6: Doddridge: *Harrison, Lewis; Tyler, Wood.
Note 7: Fayette: *Logan, Greenbrier, Nicholas, Kanawha.
Note 8: Gilmer: *Lewis, Kanawha.
Note 9: Greenbrier: In 1790 Kanawha was reported with Greenbrier.
Note 10: Jackson: *Mason, Kanawha, Wood, Lewis.
Note 11: Kanawha: *Greenbrier; in 1790 Kanawha was reported with Greenbrier.
Note 12: Lewis: *Harrison, Randolph.
Note 13: Lincoln: *Cabell, Logan, Boone, Kanawha, Wayne.
Note 14: Logan: *Giles (VA), Cabell, Kanawha, Tazewell (VA).
Note 15: Marion: *Monongalia, Harrison.
Note 16: Mercer: *Giles (VA), Tazewell (VA).
Note 17: Morgan: *Berkeley, Hampshire.
Note 18: Nicholas: *Kanawha, Greenbrier, Randolph.
Note 19: Pleasants: *Tyler, Wood; Ritchie.
Note 20: Pocahontas: *Bath (VA), Randolph, Pendleton, Greenbrier.
Note 21: Putnam: *Kanawha, Mason, Cabell.
Note 22: Ritchie: *Wood, Lewis; Harrison.
Note 23: Roane: *Kanawha, Wirt, Jackson, Gilmer.
Note 24: Summers: *Mercer, Greenbrier, Fayette.
Note 25: Taylor: *Harrison, Monongalia.
Note 26: Upshur: *Lewis, Barbour.
Note 27: Wayne: *Cabell; Wayne County's 1850-60 census boundaries were virtually the same as those of 1880-1990.
Note 28: Webster: *Braxton, Nicholas, Randolph.
Note 29: Wirt: *Wood, Jackson

WISCONSIN NOTES
Wisconsin was part of the Northwest Territory organized in 1787, then of Indiana Territory (1800). In 1809 it was included in the new Illinois Territory, except for the northern part of the Door Peninsula, which remained in Indiana Territory. In 1818 Michigan Territory expanded to include the whole of present-day Wisconsin. Wisconsin Territory was organized in 1836 and briefly included all of Minnesota and Iowa and the Dakotas east of the Missouri River. After Iowa Territory was organized in 1838, only northeastern Minnesota, east of the Mississippi River and a line from its source north to the Canadian boundary, remained in Wisconsin Territory. Wisconsin was admitted as a State on May 29, 1848 with essentially its present boundaries.
There was only limited census coverage of the present area of the State prior to 1840. In 1790 the Northwest Territory had no census coverage. The 1800 census for Indiana Territory reported populations for Green Bay (50) and Prairie du Chien (65); in 1810 any settlers enumerated in these or other Wisconsin communities were reported as part of St. Clair County, Illinois Territory. In 1820 Crawford and Brown Counties, Michigan Territory, included nearly all of present-day Wisconsin; Crawford also included northeastern Minnesota but this had no census coverage. This also was the case in 1830, with the addition of Iowa County from part of Crawford. In 1840 some persons in northeastern Minnesota were enumerated in St. Croix County, Wisconsin Territory.
County Notes:
Note 1: Total for 1820 is of Brown and Crawford Counties, Michigan Territory; total for 1830 is for these and Iowa County, Michigan Territory; the population enumerated in these counties was within the present boundaries of Wisconsin. Total for 1890 includes population (6,450) of certain Indian reservations, not reported by county.
Note 2: Menominee County was formed in 1961 from part of Shawano County (1960 pop. 2,345) and part of Oconto County (1960 pop. 261).
Note 3: Portage County's 1840 census boundaries comprised most of present-day Columbia County and did not include any of present-day Portage County.
Note 4: Winnebago County's 1840 census boundaries were the same as those of 1860-1990; its 1850 boundaries included extensive additional territory.
Note 5: Wood County's 1860 census boundaries were the same as those of 1880-1990.

WYOMING NOTES
Although most of Wyoming was acquired as early as the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, organized government began with the establishment of Oregon, Nebraska, and Utah Territories (1848-54). Later the area was included in Idaho, Dakota, and Utah Territories until Wyoming Territory was established in 1868 with the present State boundaries. Wyoming was admitted as a State on July 10, 1890.
In 1850 and 1860 present-day Wyoming had only limited census coverage, as part of Utah and Nebraska Territories. In 1870 census coverage included the whole of Wyoming Territory.
County Notes:
Note 1: Fremont: Total for 1890 includes population (1,850) of Wind River Indian Reservation, reported separately.
Note 2: Yellowstone National Park: In 1890-1920, includes any population enumerated in the Idaho and Montana portions of the park; in 1930-1960, represents the portion of the park in Wyoming; this portion was included in Teton and Park Counties beginning in 1970.

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